Brose to make composite carriers

German firm invests more than EURO 3m in facility.

German vehicle door and seat component supplier Brose Fahrzeugteile is poised to start producing its composite door-module carrier using new Husky equipment.

The carrier – the skeleton of a car door, housing components such as the lock, window guide and speakers – will be produced using an in-line compounding system. The system is based on a new 1,650-tonne Quadloc injection moulding press from Husky Injection Molding Systems.

Brose of Coburg, Germany, announced at an IAA motor show that it had developed its first plastic door module (PRWmold.wiki 15/09/2005). It has since invested more than €3m ($4.4 million) to acquire and install the production technology at its newly centralised door systems plant in Hallstadt, Germany.

To get the injection moulding equipment operational, Brose had to expand the plant infrastructure, installing a crane to handle the moulds, which can weigh more than 66,000 pounds, in addition to cooling systems.

The integration of its large window regulator and door systems divisions at Hallstadt means Brose is now responsible for complete door development, according to Matthias Drewniok, manager of the Hallstadt site.

Drewniok said: “The decision to produce the plastic carriers for our door systems ourselves and to increase the in-company levels of manufacturing was a logical step in this integration system.”

Brose produces door and window products for more than 40 automotive brands.

It said that the central location for product development, tool planning and production allows for short development times, optimal product design and cost-effective production.

An increasing number of auto part suppliers now are using composite carriers instead of conventional steel carrier modules. Husky argued that this brings benefits such as the ability to design materials with the most suitable properties and most attractive cost, lighter parts for fuel efficiency and the consolidation of many parts into one.

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